Back To Top
intro
svg-hl1.hbs

With the global population expected to reach 8 billion by 2023, today’s human development challenges cry out for urgent, bold and novel solutions.

A message from our CEO, Patrick C. Fine

This report is about people — people who, faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges, remain determined to shape their own destinies and contribute to their communities.

Learn more about how we partner with individuals, communities and nations to support people in addressing the major forces that affect their lives.

A message from Patrick C. Fine

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, FHI 360

Patrick C. Fine headshotThis report is about people — people who, faced with seemingly insurmountable challenges, remain determined to shape their own destinies and contribute to their communities.

We live in an era of unprecedented prosperity with plenty of evidence of progress in addressing human development needs. Yet, global trends are placing many of these gains at risk. With the global population expected to reach 8 billion by 2023, it is easy to believe the world’s problems are too big to overcome.

The impact of climate change looms larger every day, while the outbreak of deadly epidemics, political instability and crippling unemployment have given rise to a wave of humanitarian crises of unprecedented scale. Today’s crises cry out for urgent, bold and novel solutions.

In FHI 360’s 2018 annual report, we share some of the ways we are using cutting-edge research, technology-enabled approaches and entrepreneurial ingenuity to build resilient institutions and equip people to address major forces shaping the world — from preventing the spread of infectious disease, to preparing citizens for 21st-century jobs, to using digital technologies to improve decision-making and lower costs. Our goal is to enable people to make their lives and their communities healthier, safer and more prosperous. And because today’s challenges call for new types of solutions, we also introduce you to FHI Ventures, a new subsidiary that is part of our growing family of organizations built to create greater social impact.

We hope that when you meet the motorcycle taxi driver in Vietnam committed to staying healthy for his daughter and wife, the graduate student in Morocco building skills for a future career and the young man in the United States determined to make a fresh start, you will be as inspired as we are. And, you will see that when individuals, institutions and governments all work together, we are able to marshal our collective strengths in ways that make what seemed impossible, possible.

Our experience over the last year reinforces a simple truth: When people have the chance to improve their lives and build their communities, they will seize the opportunity and contribute to a better future for everyone.

Warm regards,

CEO signature

Patrick C. Fine
Chief Executive Officer, FHI 360


Photo credit: Leanne Gray/FHI 360

Photo:Mbuto Machili/FHI 360
Photo credit

State-of-the-art TB control

Linda Musonda

Zambia

State-of-the-art TB control

Linda Musonda
Zambia

Health worker in Zambia examines x-rayLinda Musonda had many reasons to worry about the recovery of each of her patients. As a nurse officer at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia — the main referral site for complicated multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients — Linda understood well the challenges of curing MDR-TB and preventing its spread to others. MDR-TB is a growing global threat spread through contact with individuals and is exacerbated by overcrowded facilities and poor ventilation. Treatment spans many months.

Until 2018, patients with MDR-TB at Linda’s hospital were treated alongside other patients. They shared toilets, bathing facilities and communal spaces, which put everyone at risk. Patients with HIV were at particular risk. Health care workers feared that they, too, would become infected.

“The situation was bad,” said Linda, who has worked at the hospital for 15 years. “Infection control was difficult to manage.” In 2016, it became clear that urgent action was needed when an evaluation of Zambia’s National TB Program found that conditions at the facility put health workers, patients and visitors at risk.

Raising the standard of care

Challenge TB, which is managed by FHI 360 in Zambia, responded with a major renovation that converted an unused building at the hospital into a state-of-the-art TB ward. The new 54-bed ward is secluded from the rest of the hospital, protecting patients, staff and visitors from cross-infections. The ward is fully equipped with the latest infection control measures, such as fans to extract potentially infectious airdrops, germicidal ultraviolet irradiation to kill infectious TB particles and personal protective equipment for staff and patients. The ward also has its own water tank, which has eliminated periodic interruptions in water supply.

The nurses who serve the ward have been trained on how to protect themselves and others when coming into contact with MDR-TB patients. They also learned how to use new equipment and how to conduct assessments on infection protection and control activities that reduce the risk of hospital-borne TB infections.

In addition to the new ward, the hospital has improved screening and outpatient care for TB patients. Patients are now screened at an open-air shelter outside the ward, which minimizes interaction with other patients. Doctors determine whether TB patients need to be hospitalized or can be treated by a trained health worker at home or a nearby health facility.

Nurse Musonda, who manages the new ward, said the renovated facility and changes in outpatient care have made a real difference. “It was difficult to follow up with MDR-TB patients before,” she said. “Now, we are able to manage our TB patients better.” Her job satisfaction has also improved. “The nurses are enjoying the environment. It is easier to interact with the patients. I feel motivated. Even just working in a cleaner environment motivates me to work.”

Challenge TB is renovating two additional MDR-TB sites in Kabwe and Mansa and completed renovation at the main building of the National TB Reference Laboratory. The renovation of the laboratory created a better workflow, made the facility cleaner and safer, and provided an environment for quality rapid diagnostics.


Project: Challenge TB

Funder: USAID


Photo credit: Mbuto Machili/FHI 360

Photo:Vu Ngoc Dung/FHI 360
Photo credit

Leading the way in financing the HIV response

Vietnam

Leading the way in financing the HIV response

Vietnam

Health care worker in Vietnam speaking to patient Business is good for 38-year-old Nguyen Van Huy.* A motorbike taxi driver, Huy weaves and honks through the clogged streets of Hanoi. He makes around 5 million Vietnamese dong per month (US$215), enough to support his wife and nine-year-old daughter. “I feel I have a normal life,” says Huy.

It has been 10 years since Huy received the news that he has HIV, which he believes he contracted from injecting drugs. “I was very sick at that time,” says Huy, who was put on lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART) that he continues to take today.

People with HIV need lifelong treatment, but those who start ART early and stay on treatment are able to lead healthy lives and are unlikely to transmit HIV, which is critical to managing the epidemic. Vietnam is home to nearly a quarter million people living with HIV, with a large portion of infections concentrated among key populations, including people who inject drugs. Of the 132,000 people living with HIV and on treatment in Vietnam, 94 percent have suppressed viral loads, which eliminates the likelihood of sexually transmitting HIV.

Transition to domestic financing for long-term sustainability

For years, ART has been supported in Vietnam via international aid, much of it through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). As Vietnam’s economy grows and becomes less dependent on aid, the government has been developing a transition plan to manage its HIV care and treatment services and to finance 100 percent of the cost of ART by 2020, using social health insurance and provincial budgets.

Key goals in the transition included revising the social health insurance law and benefits package to cover funding for HIV treatment and integrating HIV clinics into the public health system, as well as procuring antiretroviral medications through the social health insurance program and creating procedures for HIV services reimbursement. The number of HIV patients enrolled in social health insurance increased from 40 percent in 2014 to 90 percent by the end of 2018.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has supported this transition through the USAID Sustainable HIV Response from Technical Assistance (USAID SHIFT) project. USAID SHIFT builds upon the success of the Sustainable Management of the HIV/AIDS Response and Transition to Technical Assistance (SMART-TA) program, which transformed the way HIV prevention, care and treatment services are delivered in Vietnam.

USAID SHIFT has partnered with provincial leaders to develop roadmaps to ensure that health facilities become certified to deliver services covered by the social health insurance program. The project conducts rigorous quality assessments and financial analyses of health facility expenditures and personnel to identify cost-efficiencies and staffing needs. Doctors, nurses, lab technicians, counselors and pharmacists are trained to ensure that patients understand the importance of social health insurance and enroll. Patients receive support developing individual continuation treatment plans to ensure that they adhere to their treatment regimens. These plans are regularly updated and include social health insurance as key to ensuring sustainable care.

USAID also developed national guidelines for data collection and is upgrading the national health information system for improved monitoring of the epidemic and social health insurance usage. Separate data systems for outreach, testing, treatment and social health insurance enrollment are now linked to ensure that people who need services receive them. As a result of USAID SHIFT support, health providers can now access accurate and timely data through dashboards.

Now, Huy has successfully enrolled in social health insurance and will continue to receive ART for free. “Today, I feel good and my health is much improved,” he says. “I always have hope there will be a cure for HIV, but until that time, I will continue to take my medications so I can stay healthy for my daughter and wife.”

* Name has been changed.

Project: USAID’s Sustainable HIV Response From Technical Assistance

Funder: USAID, U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief


Photo credit: Vu Ngoc Dung/FHI 360

Photo:Leanne Gray/FHI 360
Photo credit

Youth get a second chance

Christopher Collins

United States

Youth get a second chance

Christopher Collins
United States

Young man speaking to mentorAs a young boy, Christopher Collins showed promise. He loved to play sports, attended a gifted and talented program in middle school and graduated from high school. But growing up in a high-crime neighborhood in St. Louis stacked the deck against him. At 21 years of age, Christopher was arrested for gun possession and served 20 months in jail for a Class D felony.

Making it on your own can be daunting for any young adult in the United States. But, youth who have recently been incarcerated face staggering challenges. Many of them lack the safety net provided by family, friends and social services. With little or no work experience and a limited education, they struggle to find jobs. Employers often do not hire them after seeing their criminal records. This cycle of wanting a job but repeatedly being rejected makes them vulnerable to recidivism.

Chris did not know where to turn when he finished his sentence. He did not have a social security card or government-sponsored identification needed to get a job. "I was lost," he said. "It was like, who do you ask for help when you get out of jail?"

Then he met Tasha Robinson, who was recruiting youth participants for the Compass Rose Collaborative, which helps young people between the ages of 18 and 24 transition from the justice system into productive employment or education. "I gave them my number, and they actually called me back the next day. Ever since then, everything was easy, because I had a support system. I had a mentor."

A pathway to productive employment

Through Compass Rose, Chris participated in apprenticeships for building, carpentry and other skills. He learned how to create a budget and manage money and how to write a resume, dress for an interview and communicate with employers about his background and qualifications. He credits Tasha, his mentor, for pushing him — for never giving up on him.

Launched in 2017 and now active in eight U.S. cities, Compass Rose recruits youth from neighborhoods with crime and poverty rates exceeding 30 percent. The young participants are given options to pursue their education, gain vocational skills or seek employment. They also receive assistance with basic needs, such as housing, food assistance, transportation, child care and legal services, and access to a caring adult to provide support along their journey. FHI 360 leads Compass Rose and coordinates partners, activities and action plans across all sites. In St. Louis, for example, Compass Rose works in partnership with SLATE (the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment), which conducts the program activities available to Chris.

By the end of 2018, halfway through the grant, data from the first three cities that participated in the collaborative showed that of the 375 young people who participated, 64 percent received job skills training, 25 percent held apprenticeships and 30 percent earned a vocational certification. Almost 50 percent of participants have gone on to further education or employment. The program will serve more than 1,100 young people by 2021.

Chris now has a full-time job as a machine operator but dreams of being an entrepreneur. He is also focused on being a good father to his daughter, who was born in December 2018.

"I have a lot of ideas," he said. "I am just trying to get a start."

The Compass Rose Collaborative is funded through the U.S. Department of Labor's Reentry Project. The $4.5 million federal award supports work in Hartford, CT; St. Louis, MO; and Los Angeles, CA. Local funding also supports the project.


Project: Compass Rose Collaborative

Funder: U.S. Department of Labor, Reentry Project


Photo credit: Leanne Gray/FHI 360

Photo:Andrew Renneisen/Stringer/Getty Images
Photo credit

An integrated response addresses urgent needs

Yemen

An integrated response addresses urgent needs

Yemen

The civil war in Yemen has persisted for four years and resulted in the world's worst humanitarian disaster, with roughly 4 of 5 Yemenis in urgent need of assistance. The conflict has caused widespread food insecurity and malnutrition, straining the basic health care system to the breaking point.

In 2018, FHI 360 began working with communities near the front lines of the conflict. Our assessments identified a severe need for assistance in the coastal western districts of Dhubab, Al Mokha and Al Khawkhah. Until recently, these areas were inaccessible to international organizations.

FHI 360's integrated approach is well suited to humanitarian emergencies and to fostering collaboration with community stakeholders, the United Nations and government institutions to identify and prioritize needs.

Our first priority in Yemen was to restore access to critical primary health care services, starting by rehabilitating the Al Ghaded Health Center in Ta'iz, a facility that had been partially destroyed and was unable to function. Simultaneously, FHI 360 worked with the Al Mokha and Al Khawkhah Maternal and Child Health centers to meet rapidly increasing demand because of the influx of internally displaced people and lack of technical, financial and administrative support from the central government.

Our assistance included ensuring the availability of qualified health workers; building technical capacity of health staff, including training midwives, nurses and clinicians on topics such as basic emergency obstetric and newborn care and community management of acute malnutrition; providing essential medicines; upgrading cold chain capacity; and improving water supply, sanitation and waste management systems.

From crisis to resilience

FHI 360 is committed to drawing upon our depth and breadth of experience in building local capacities and evidence for long-term development solutions. We apply lessons learned in international development work to create pathways for crisis-affected communities to initiate recovery and build resilience. Our work in Yemen continues to build a bridge between emergency response and long-term recovery.


Project: Integrated Humanitarian Assistance to Yemen

Funder: USAID, Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance

hl2

We work hand-in-hand with our partners to create HEALTHY, EMPOWERED and MORE PROSPEROUS communities.

Photo:Amira Azzouzi/FHI 360
Photo credit

You’re hired: 21st-century career centers

Kenza Elbouazzaoui

Morocco

You're hired: 21st-century career centers

Kenza Elbouazzaoui
Morocco

Students on computers in the career centerThere was a time when Kenza Elbouazzaoui, a graduate student in materials science engineering, worried about finding a job. In Morocco, more than 18 percent of university or vocational training graduates are unemployed, and young women face an even higher disadvantage. While graduates are eager to work, they do not know how to navigate the job market and find positions that match their competencies and interests. At the same time, employers cannot find candidates with the skills they need. This situation creates uncertainty for young jobseekers. Kenza was no exception. "I was scared," she said. "I didn't understand that jobs were even available."

Bridging the gap between employers and youth

The USAID Career Center project in Morocco has partnered with universities and technical and vocational education and training institutions to open six pilot centers on campuses in three cities, plus a virtual center to cater to those not enrolled in public institutions. These career centers prepare students for employment in high-growth sectors. Real-time, localized information about job market trends and opportunities is coupled with work readiness training, internships and networking opportunities that connect students and employers. To ensure that the needs of youth were met, youth were involved in building and branding the centers, designing facilities and developing services, all of which hold the youth who manage the centers accountable for the success of the centers.

This cutting-edge model uses data and industry-specific analyses from private-sector employment trends to develop curricula and services in a manner not offered before in Morocco. A defining feature is the significant role that businesses play in the design and delivery of activities, including "Sunrise Briefings," which provide a forum for employers to share their needs and industry insights with career centers and university faculty to respond better to labor market needs. This systems approach encourages stronger connections between the public and private sectors, educators, employers, government and youth.

Practical skills for real-world jobs

At the career center, Kenza obtained a better understanding of labor market demand and learned what resources were available, where to look for employment opportunities and how to use the center's job search tool to identify energy-sector positions relevant to her field of study — jobs that were difficult to find elsewhere. "Using the virtual tool, we can explore all the jobs that are available to us in our region. It [the tool] is very easy," she explained.

Center staff, predominantly youth themselves, take the time to get to know the students individually so that they can personalize services. Counselors host workshops and help students articulate their professional and personal goals. Career Center Youth Ambassadors, such as Kenza, support the centers in organizing events. Through their efforts encouraging their peers to take advantage of center services, youth ambassadors also build their own leadership and public-speaking skills. Kenza, for example, created and launched a "Digital Days" event for digital experts to share advice on jobs in that sector.

In Morocco, career centers are catching on. More than 86,000 students in 2018 used the career center services and almost 16,000 students completed workforce readiness training. The virtual career center logged more than 500,000 page views, and nearly 29,000 individuals registered with the site. The project worked in partnership with 126 companies or business organizations. Although the career centers are more focused on youth employability than job placement, a 2018 survey of virtual center users shows that more than 63 percent of respondents found a job or internship.

The career center experience can be transformative, helping students to understand career pathways and the skills and education required to get there. Kenza now has a sense of direction and possibility, aiming to finish her studies and pursue a career in materials science in the energy sector.


Project: USAID Career Center

Funder: USAID


Photo credit: Amira Azzouzi/FHI 360

Photo:Leanne Gray/FHI 360
Photo credit

Girl power

Jane Nyathi

Zimbabwe

Girl power

Jane Nyathi
Zimbabwe

Young woman having a conversation with an adolescent girl.Girls and young women can be powerful agents for change, but far too many are denied opportunities to develop the self-confidence that is key to taking control of their destinies.

Jane Nyathi is not one of them. The 24-year-old is an assistant program officer for the Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored and Safe Women (DREAMS) public-private partnership in Zimbabwe.

Based in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe's second largest city, Jane, along with her colleagues, focuses on reducing new HIV infections among adolescent girls and young women ages 15 to 24 in six high-HIV-burden districts.

Through DREAMS, FHI 360 delivers a comprehensive curriculum that focuses on HIV prevention, positive gender norms and building social assets, including social safety nets through mentors, peer groups, civic engagement and access to health information and services. The curriculum is targeted toward adolescent girls and young women and their sexual partners.

The need is great, and obstacles for young women, who should be looking toward the future with hope and optimism, can seem insurmountable. Poverty, gender inequality, sexual violence, social isolation and limited schooling increase adolescent girls' and young women's vulnerability to HIV. "Young women in Zimbabwe are sometimes in relationships so that they can survive," said Jane. "It is difficult in Zimbabwe for you to even have a dollar to spend on anything or to buy credit for your phone."

Building confidence and skills

Jane has daily conversations with adolescent girls about how to access sexual and reproductive health and HIV services. She talks with community leaders about changing the gender norms and stigmas attached to using reproductive health services. She works with educational service providers who help adolescent girls go back to school or receive vocational training. And, she also helps adolescent girls develop their own income-generating activities.

"My hope is that each and every girl in Zimbabwe will have the opportunity to fully reach her highest potential in life," said Jane. "If they are able to be independent, to be financially stable, to be who they want to be, I believe that we will have a better Zimbabwe."

In fiscal year 2018, FHI 360 reached about 42,500 adolescent girls in school and about 76,000 adolescent girls out of school with information on HIV prevention and gender norms. More than 22,000 community members received HIV prevention services.

Jane is an example of how empowering girls unleashes unlimited possibilities. She started with the program as a member of a DREAMS club in 2016, was hired by FHI 360 as a district facilitator and has been promoted to her current position. "DREAMS is what I am today," she said. "The program has made me want to make so many changes in other people's lives."

This past year, Jane demonstrated her leadership on a global stage. At the 2018 International Conference on Family Planning in Rwanda, Jane spoke for the 600 youth who attended the conference and offered her views on the importance of investments in family planning. Said Jane of the experience, "It was just the beginning of all of my dreams."

Watch Jane's participation at the conference.


Project: Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored and Safe Women (DREAMS)

Funder: USAID, U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief


Photo credit: Courtesy of Jane Nyathi

Photo:Hadynyah/Getty Images
Photo credit

Moving closer to wiping out neglected diseases

Laos

Moving closer to wiping out neglected diseases

Laos

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) — often caused by parasites, mosquitoes and worms — affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, causing pain, disability and, in some cases, death. For many NTDs, annual one-dose treatments and education around healthy behavior can make a dramatic impact — one that is highly cost-effective. In Laos, FHI 360 has been working with the government to control and eliminate the country's most prevalent NTDs.

Lymphatic filariasis (commonly known as elephantiasis): FHI 360 assisted the Ministry of Health in conducting the annual mass drug administration in Attapu Province, the only one in Laos where lymphatic filariasis was endemic. Due to the success of this effort, the World Health Organization confirmed that Laos is close to eliminating lymphatic filariasis and may now shift away from expensive mass treatment campaigns.

Schistosomiasis (commonly known as snail fever): An integrated public health and education approach is supporting ongoing efforts to control this disease. In a collaboration between the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health, FHI 360 supported the training of 143 school teachers as part of the schistosomiasis control program in Champasak Province, where the disease is endemic. The teachers learned how to promote healthy prevention behaviors and ways to support mass drug administrations.

Soil-transmitted helminthes (hookworm, roundworm and whipworm): A partnership with the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Education and Sports supported a school-based deworming program for about two million children ages 6 to 14 years. FHI 360 organized trainings that prepared 3,000 teachers and principals in nine provinces to work with children and their parents to prevent and treat the infections.

FHI 360 also worked with the Ministry of Health to strengthen its capacity to manage the national NTD program, including the development of work plans, budgets and reports to ensure sustainable funding and effective systems to assess the impact of program activities.


In Africa, FHI 360 has been working with USAID to end NTDs for more than a decade. Watch this video and learn more about our NTD work with USAID in Africa.


Project: Neglected Tropical Disease Support in Laos

Funder: Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies

Photo:Kunle Lawal/FHI 360
Photo credit

Literacy improved through local language learning

Nigeria

Literacy improved through local language learning

Nigeria

In Nigeria's northwest states of Katsina and Zamfara, fewer than one-quarter of children can read a single word. Children without basic reading and math skills are less likely to finish school and hold jobs.

That is changing since the Reading and Numeracy Activity (RANA) project introduced Hausa language teaching materials in grades 1-3. RANA also equips teachers with new techniques, engages local governments in school oversight and mobilizes parents to be involved in their children's education.

In 2018, the Katsina and Zamfara state governments adopted the Hausa Early Grade Reading Implementation Guideline, which outlines state education authorities' responsibility for supporting Hausa literacy. FHI 360 collaborated with local government and community organizations to develop the guidelines. The Katsina state government has printed and distributed more than 353,000 RANA-authored student workbooks.

The impact of teaching early grade reading is clear: During the 2017–2018 school year, RANA students showed a 47 percent improvement in letter-sound recognition and the percentage of students who could not read one word decreased by 15 percent. The percentage of girls with basic literacy skills increased from 29 percent to more than 55 percent from 2015 to 2018. The project is expanding to four additional states — Bauchi, Kebbi, Niger and Sokoto.

Watch how RANA is transforming lives in northwest Nigeria.


Project: The Reading and Numeracy Activity

Funder: UNICEF, with support from the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID)

hl3

We generate cutting-edge research, apply technology in novel ways and invest in entrepreneurship to deliver greater social impact.

Photo:FHI 360
Photo credit

FHI Ventures is launched to scale impact

FHI Ventures is launched to scale impact

FHI Ventures logo

Social entrepreneurs solve problems, developing products and services with the potential to save and improve lives on a global scale. But, without funding and support, good ideas are unlikely to become profitable businesses that reach those who benefit from new products and services.

In 2018, FHI 360 launched FHI Ventures, a for-profit impact-investing subsidiary dedicated to accelerating the growth of early-stage social enterprises that employ commercial strategies for improvements in development. FHI Ventures invests capital into a small group of companies, aligned with FHI 360's mission, to position them to attract further funding and expand the reach of their products. FHI Ventures also offers individualized coaching and advisory support to develop business strategy, raise capital and manage growth. FHI 360's global reach provides an opportunity to source viable business innovations and attract potential investors.

FHI Ventures selected five companies for the inaugural group through a highly competitive process. These early-stage companies offer novel products designed to solve pressing development challenges: the spread of infectious disease and lack of clean water and basic sanitation. FyodorBio makes a urine test that can rapidly diagnose malaria, and UrSure produces a patient-friendly urine test that supports adherence to HIV prevention drugs. Sanivation provides sanitation services that transform human waste into affordable fuel, and SweetSense makes remote sensors that improve the reliability of public water utilities in emerging economies. The fifth company, Mark Labs, offers a tool to improve decision-making in the human development sector through a technology platform that quantifies social impact for investors.

Investments that can change the world

Since entering the FHI Ventures program, all five companies have experienced measurable business growth, have cumulatively raised an additional US$1.6 million thus far and are actively pursuing partnership opportunities to scale into new markets. Describing the impact that participating in the program has had on his company, Giffin Daughtridge, Chief Executive Officer of UrSure, said, "While the [financial] investment is great, the amount of additional resources and the network that comes with being part of the FHI 360 family have proved to be an accelerator for us in every sense of the word."

FHI 360 continues to partner with the inaugural portfolio companies, and selection of the next round of FHI Ventures investments is underway.

Learn more about FHI 360's family of subsidiaries.


FHI 360 subsidiary: FHI Ventures

Photo:Leanne Gray/FHI 360
Photo credit

Groundbreaking contraceptive technologies

Groundbreaking contraceptive technologies

More than 200 million women living in low-income regions of the world do not want to become pregnant but are not using effective contraceptive methods. For some of these women, access to contraception is limited; for others, available methods are not acceptable or affordable. FHI 360's research is creating important global inroads in expanding access to quality, affordable and acceptable new contraceptive methods for those most in need.

Since 2013, FHI 360's work under our Contraceptive Technology Innovation (CTI) Initiative has strived to advance the development and evaluation of game changing innovations that offer safe, effective, low-cost, easy-to-use and appealing contraceptives to women. The work focuses on existing technology gaps by developing products with attributes that women want but are not available among current family planning options.

In 2018, the research continued to focus on creating novel contraceptive options by adapting innovative drug delivery platforms being studied for other therapeutic areas — including a biodegradable microneedle patch, biodegradable implants and longer-acting self-injectables. CTI is also evaluating a smaller copper intrauterine device. Collaboration with product development scientists at universities, small biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, and manufacturing groups and service delivery organizations is a hallmark of our inclusive research model that quickly moves innovative ideas through development to production.

FHI 360 also continues to generate evidence to determine how expanded access to the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) — a safe, long-acting, highly effective contraceptive — could potentially increase contraceptive choice for women in developing countries. The LNG-IUS is already popular among women in many high-income countries and provides both contraceptive and noncontraceptive benefits. FHI 360 is expanding information to increase funders' and decision-makers' understanding of the potential value of adding the LNG-IUS to the contraception choices women have in sub-Saharan Africa. The information could also help inform national introduction and scale-up plans.


Project: Contraceptive Technology Innovation Initiative

Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


Project: Envision FP

Funder: USAID


Project: Learning about Expanded Access and Potential of the LNG-IUS Initiative

Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Photo credit

Evidence to avert maternal and newborn deaths

Ethiopia and Mozambique

Evidence to avert maternal and newborn deaths

Ethiopia and Mozambique

Timely access to quality health care is critical in an emergency. Every minute counts when saving a life.

Researchers at FHI 360 generated complex geospatial models in a geographic information system (GIS) for Ethiopia and Mozambique to calculate travel times to community and regional emergency obstetric and newborn care services. Through this modeling, FHI 360 analyzed the distance women must travel to emergency obstetric and newborn care facilities to provide policymakers with accurate information about women's travel time. The mapped results showed vast disparities in access, such as demonstrating that roughly a quarter of the population in both countries is more than five hours from lifesaving services. Researchers then modeled improvement scenarios in GIS to show where upgrading facilities, adding ambulances and improving communications could curb maternal and newborn mortality.


Project: Averting Maternal Death and Disability Program (Ethiopia)

Funder: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation


Project: Monitoring and Evaluation to Assess and Use Results (MEASURE) Evaluation Phase IV (Mozambique)

Funder: USAID

Photo:Sergio Somerville/FHI 360
Photo credit

Data drives impact

Tanzania and Zanzibar

Data drives impact

Tanzania and Zanzibar

Technology is changing the way we make decisions by providing managers with real-time facility level information. FHI 360 is working with governments to harness the power of new digital tools to troubleshoot complex issues, rapidly remediate problems and allocate resources wisely.

In Tanzania, FHI 360 is using the m360 School Information System (SIS) — an open-source Android-based solution — to facilitate onsite data collection, analysis and real-time data visualizations and reports for schools. The m360 SIS collects current information on classroom performance and attendance along with the ability for geographic information system (GIS) mapping and verification. Daily data capture, interactive dashboards and automated alerts and notifications support teachers and principals in monitoring and managing resources.

The m360 SIS works offline and uses short-message service (SMS) technology to transfer data in remote areas, providing complete coverage and helping policymakers to make data-driven decisions to support student success. During 2018, the use of the m360 SIS in Tanzania increased from 4,000 to 8,000 schools, serving nearly 4 million students. In addition, FHI 360 deployed m360 SIS to about 400 schools in Zanzibar, reaching as many as 200,000 students.

The m360 SIS is a customizable system built on FHI 360's open-source mobile platform.


Project: Education Quality Improvement Program-Tanzania (EQUIP-T): Developing an Integrated EMIS

Funder: U.K. Department for International Development (DFID)


Project: Tusome Pamoja (Zanzibar)

Funder: USAID, as a sub-prime implementer to RTI International

hl4

When people have the chance to improve their lives and build their communities, they will seize the opportunity and contribute to a better future for everyone.

Learn more

Read about FHI 360 and our work

Share