Project

PROGRESS in Tanzania: National Family Planning Costed Implementation Program

Like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania's once successful family planning program has slowed markedly, with rates of contraceptive prevalence well below levels needed to reach current demand and country goals. In 2009, to help Tanzania reach its target of 60 percent contraceptive prevalence by 2015, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) engaged FHI 360 and the PROGRESS project to serve as the secretariat for developing a National Family Planning Costed Implementation Program (NFPCIP).

Launched by the MOHSW in March 2010, the NFPCIP emphasizes five strategic areas for implementation, with a special focus on contraceptive security and integrated service delivery of family planning in all aspects of the health sector. The plan includes cost estimates, based on a forecasting approach, for each strategic area and each year between 2010 and 2015.

Hon. Prof. David Mwakyusa, Minister, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, cuts the ribbon launching the new Tanzania National Family Planning Costed Implementation Program.
Hon. Prof. David Mwakyusa, Minister, MOHSW, cuts the ribbon launching the new Tanzania NFPCIP. From left are Christine Lasway, FHI 360; Dr. Julitta Onabanjo, UNFPA Country Representative; Rose Wasira, Reproductive and Child Health Section Program Officer/NFPCIP Focal Point; and Mrs. Blandina Nyoni, Permanent Secretary, MOHSW.

Since the launch of the NFPCIP, the government of Tanzania has established a family planning line item in the national budget. FHI 360 is also supporting the MOHSW and partners to monitor resource mobilization and program performance as a result of implementation. The NFPCIP is currently being revised to reflect ongoing learning from two years of implementation and from the release of the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey.

"What is required of us is to ensure that the National Family Planning Costed Implementation Program is implemented fully," Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete told the London Summit on Family Planning in July 2012. The innovative program has attracted attention outside of Tanzania, as it may hold promise as a model for planning and potentially implementing similar programs in other countries.

The NFPCIP and background information are available here:


PROGRESS (Program Research for Strengthening Services) was a five-year project awarded to FHI 360 by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in June 2008. The project sought to improve access to family planning among underserved populations by providing global technical leadership and working in selected countries.

Countries:
  • Tanzania
Funder: USAID
Duration: 2010 - 2013