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Event

FHI 360's presence at the 2016 Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit

September 27, 2016

FHI 360 will join peers from around the world for the 10th annual Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit September 28–30, 2016, in Washington, DC. This year’s theme is “Turning Points: How Do We Achieve Results and Scale in the Next Decade?” The conference will explore that theme across five technical tracks, providing global development stakeholders with an opportunity to exchange ideas about how to increase economic opportunities for young people.

Key FHI 360 sessions include the following.

Thursday, September 29

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
Conference Room: Salon F/G
Applying the Evidence: Positive Youth Development Improves Cross-Sectoral Youth Outcomes
 

Summary

Positive youth development and cross-sectoral interventions are designed to improve youth outcomes, but there is little evidence on the effectiveness of these interventions in the international context and on which combination of interventions has the greatest impact. This session builds on learning efforts under USAID’s YouthPower Learning and YouthPower Action projects. Presenters will share findings from a systematic review of the effectiveness of positive youth development in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on improving skills and workforce development. They will also explore the evidence on the impact of integrated workforce development and sexual and reproductive health interventions. The chair will facilitate a discussion of how to integrate these findings, as well as identify data gaps and what participants can do to fill those gaps.

FHI 360 Presenters:

Tommy Galloway, Technical Officer
Diana Rutherford, Senior Research and Evaluation Specialist

Thursday, September 29

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
Conference Room: Salons A, B, C, D/E

Fail Festival for Youth Economic Opportunities

Summary

Failure is normal when we take risks, innovate and test new ideas. In the private sector, this experimentation is called research and development and is considered key to long-term success. But there is no parallel term in the field of youth and international development. Audience participation in this session is expected — and laughter is encouraged — as we take an honest look at where we have all gone wrong in leadership, communication, program design and youth engagement and we discuss the valuable lessons that come from failure.

FHI 360 Moderator:

Wayan Vota, Senior Mobile Advisor

Friday, September 30

11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Conference Room: Salon J
Key Soft Skill Impacts Across Sectors: Evidence and Youth Voice

Summary

USAID’s YouthPower Action project has conducted a study that identifies a core set of soft skills that predict positive outcomes across the fields of workforce development, violence prevention, and sexual and reproductive health. This study builds on the Workforce Connections report, Key Soft Skills that Foster Youth Workforce Success, which was highlighted at last year’s summit. This session will present the results of the Key Skills for Cross-Sectoral Youth Outcomes study, which identifies the most important soft skills that relateg to violence prevention and reproductive health. Panelists include experts in violence prevention and reproductive health, who will discuss the findings of the study. Participants will address findings from both studies and the implications of those findings for youth programming.

FHI 360 Moderators:

Kristin Brady, Director, Youth Department
Laura Lippman, Senior Technical Advisor

Friday, September 30

1:45 p.m.–2:45 p.m.
Conference Room: Salon F/G
Soft Skills, Hard Task: The Challenge of Measurement

Summary

Research findings from the YouthPower Action project have significantly contributed to the identification of a suite of measurement tools for the soft skills that drive youth success in the workforce, sexual and reproductive health, and violence prevention. The findings point out the types of soft skills that these tools most often target, the importance of common definitions and scale for measuring these skills, and the breadth of where these tools are used. This session will provide insight into some of the most useful tools for youth programs and why they are most useful. Participants will discuss the challenges and lessons learned by implementers and funders involved in this work, as well as identify areas for further support.

FHI 360 Moderator:

Laura Lippman, Senior Technical Advisor