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Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM)
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Goals

- Introduction
- Topics
- Objectives
- What is LAM
- Normal
- Mechanisms
- Ovarian
- Ovarian
- Categories
- Categories
- Early
- Later
- History
> Bellagio
- Georgetown
- Efficacy
- Criteria 1
- Criteria 2
- Criteria 3
- Advantages
- Disadvantages
- Behaviors
- Behaviors
- Who Can Use
- Who Can Use
- Programmatic
- Counseling
- Algorithm 1
- Algorithm 2
- Algorithm 3
- Adaptations
- Extended
- Another
- First Choice
- Second Choice
- Third Choice
- Considerations
- Summary
- Summary

Conclusion

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Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM)

Bellagio Consensus

A postpartum woman has at least 98% protection from pregnancy for 6 months when she remains amenorrheic and fully or nearly fully breastfeeds.

Slide 13


In August 1988, an international panel of experts met in Bellagio, Italy to review existing data from around the world on breastfeeding patterns and delay of postpartum fertility. The purpose of the meeting was to create a set of guidelines for using breastfeeding as a means of contraception. Three factors were considered to be most accurate in predicting fertility. Using data collected from 13 studies in eight countries, the Bellagio group came to the following consensus:

“A postpartum woman has at least 98 percent protection from pregnancy for six months when she remains amenorrheic and fully or nearly fully breastfeeds.”

This description of the conditions under which breastfeeding can be used as an effective method of family planning emphasizes that breastfeeding alone does not prevent pregnancy. Rather it is the period of lactational amenorrhea and the effective breastfeeding practices that provide this protection.

 

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